Monthly Archives: July 2014

Influx by Daniel Suarez

Influx

Jon Grady expects the Nobel Prize when he discovers how to reflect gravity. Instead, he is kidnapped by the Bureau of Technology Control. For decades BTC’s driven personnel have hoarded inventions they feel would negatively impact social stability: fusion, AIs, the list seems endless. When Jon is condemned to the tortuous Hibernity prison he is determined to free its inventors and their inventions from BTC’s control…

This book gives a surreal but real feel to the near future. For instance, Suarez writes of how it would feel to fall upwards. The plot contains chases and futuristic weapons in action while encouraging thought about several areas. What makes people human, should inventions ever be restricted and what about genetic enhancements? Jon is an outsider with an unusual way of looking at the world facing off against a megalomaniac dictator distorted by his own purpose. The reader gets a look at science through Jon’s eyes and the intelligence community through several characters. Influx could be a match for those looking for action mixed with thought, conspiracies involving technology and/or intelligence agencies, and/or a thriller set in the near future.

Want other books like Influx?

A NASA publicist in 2019 becomes embroiled in conspiracy when he discovers the U.S. may have gone to the moon before the historic Apollo mission in The Cassandra Project by Jack McDevitt and Mike Resnick.

An email language optimization program evolves into AI with its own agenda in Avogadro Corp by William Hertling.

Suarez suggests reading books such as Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100 by Michio Kaku.

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Radiance of Tomorrow by Ishmael Beah

Radiance of TomorrowImperi’s citizens fled during the war, but hope brought back those who could return home. Among them are three elders, two school teachers and ex-child soldiers. They face challenges of the past and then challenges of the future when a mining company comes to Imperi. They will face the decision to give up on life or choose in the radiance of tomorrow that is hope…

The vividness of the characters, and the differing life stages they are at, brings the reader into post-war modern life in Sierra Leone. The reader wants to know what will happen to the dedicated school teachers, the quietly wise elders and others. The story is heartbreaking, while also showing the power of hope, and compelling. Beah shows the strengthening rhythms of village life -when things are as they should be- and the alluring but challenging life of the city. His metaphorical language, for instance calling hope “the radiance of tomorrow”, also brings the reader into the story. Radiance of Tomorrow could be a match for those looking for conflict in Africa, expressive language, relatable characters and/or a compelling story.

Want other books like Radiance of Tomorrow? These books also deal with Africans living in through, and after, conflict.

A poor houseboy, an African woman who has become involved with a professor and others struggle to survive war in Nigeria in the 1960s in Half a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

A Rwandan Tutsi Olympic runner struggles to survive the horror of genocide and rebuild his life after in Running the Rift by Naomi Benaron.

Beah’s memoir, A Long Way Gone, provides his look at the conflict which the characters of Radiance of Tomorrow live in the aftermath of.

 

 

 

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Xom-B by Jeremy Robinson

XOM-B

A mysterious virus erupts and starts turning people into ravaging undead protected youth Freeman’s world is shattered. As he evades undead hordes he learns of loyalty, love and dangerous secrets. The virus is no accident…

The story is action packed with many encounters with the undead. It also provokes thought especially towards the end when the ‘why’ of the virus is revealed. Freeman’s devotion towards life, loyalty to his friends and struggle to understand make him likable. Other supporting characters are likable and/or chilling. Xom-B’s world is a dystopia because Freeman learns of darkness behind the utopic façade he believed in. Xom-B could be a match for those looking for a science fiction thriller, some food for thought and/or interesting characters.

Want other books that also have zombies and some food for thought like Xom-B?

When scientists open a portal to an alternate universe they bring zombies and some issues of morality into our own in Coldbrook by Tim Lebbon.

A mathematician finds out Earth’s future will be bleak when she finds a set of kidnap victims are being pulled forward in time in After the Fall, Before the Fall, During the Fall  by Nancy Kress.

When undead overrun a small town a sheriff tries to find her sister and uncovers a paramilitary-contractor is taking advantage of the chaos in Rise Again by Ben Tripp.

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Rescuing the Heiress by Valerie Hansen

Rescuing The Heiress (Love Inspired Historical)

Socialite Tess Clark and firefighter Michael Mahoney know a relationship could only bring heartbreak. Their different classes push them apart but their bond is too deep to deny. When the San Francisco earthquake of 1906 hits they risk their lives helping others. Can Michael and Tess survive the earthquake and have a life together?

Michael and Tess are endearingly headstrong. It is a trait both must learn to use wisely. San Francisco is shown through observations of weather, street names and technology. Foreshadowing of the earthquake, disorientation experiencing it and struggling to live after it also pull the reader into the story. The plot combines suspense with some bits of humor. Rescuing the Heiress could be a match for those looking for likable characters, a tale of the San Francisco earthquake and/or Christian Romance.

Want other books like Rescuing the Heiress?

Three Fearful Days : San Francisco Memoirs of the 1906 Earthquake & Fire and other books cover the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco.

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